theweek

Putin’s troubles

October 25, 2020

Holed up in his mansion, Russia’s authoritarian leader is facing serious challenges both at home and abroad. Here’s everything you need to know:

In June, Russia changed its constitution to allow Putin, who has governed since 1999, the ability to run for two more terms — effectively making him a czar and abandoning all pretense of democracy. That amendment, Tatiana Stanovaya told Foreign Policy, signals a new era in Putin’s rule that is “much more conservative, less tolerant, more repressive.” The following month, Sergei Furgal, the popular governor of the far-eastern region of Khabarovsk, was arrested on politically motivated charges, and the region erupted in weeks of protest. Days later, Navalny released an investigative report on his blog detailing the corruption and vast wealth of Putin’s envoy to the far-east regions, Deputy Prime Minister Yuri Trutnev, further inflaming anti-Kremlin sentiment there. That may have been the impetus for Putin to attempt to kill Navalny. On Aug. 20, the activist was poisoned with an even deadlier strain of the banned nerve agent Novichok that almost killed double agent Sergei Skripal in London in 2018.

READ MORE

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest

Leave a Reply

Cookies & Privacy

By continuing to browse, you are agreeing to our use of cookies as explained in our Conditions générales.

Sign up for our emails!

Receive updates and news from R.Politik

Your email is safe with us, we don’t spam.