In the MEDIA

R.Politik CEO and founder, Tatiana Stanovaya, is regularly quoted by major Russian and international media outlets. She is available for commentary in Russian and English.

All articles published by Tatiana Stanovaya and R.Politik’s other editors and analysts will be included here. 

2018-The-Guardian-logo-design
Comment for The Guardian

Kremlin shrugs off Navalny backlash as protesters crowd jails

1,438 more reportedly arrested amid brutal police crackdown following opposition leader’s imprisonment

in Moscow

Tatiana Stanovaya, a political analyst and founder of R.Politik, said the harsh sentence against Navalny was part of a campaign to “demonstrate that no move aimed against the security services would remain unpunished”.

She said the government was ready to weather the backlash to Navalny’s imprisonment, whether it be international condemnation or street demonstrations in Russia. “Make no mistake, the Kremlin is not terribly afraid of protests,” she said.

The jailing of Navalny, who arrested last month on his return to Russia after surviving a suspected FSB assassination attempt with the poison novichok, has sparked international outrage. The US secretary of state, Anthony Blinken, has demanded his unconditional and immediate release and the UK prime minister, Boris Johnson, called the sentencing “pure cowardice”.

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times
Comment for The Times

Russia protests: Putin misjudges his greatest threat — the people

The mass demonstrations triggered by the arrest of Alexei Navalny show the president’s dark arts are failing him, writes Matthew Campbell

The Sunday Times

For Tatiana Stanovaya, a political analyst with the Carnegie Moscow Centre, this is, in a sense, the secret of his survival. “The reasons for supporting Putin have changed,” she said. “Before it was for positive reasons, people felt proud about Russia. Now they vote for him out of fear that the situation could get a lot worse under someone else. They are afraid of a return to the Yeltsin era.”

Now, though, the Kremlin has cause for serious concern. Seldom have so many government opponents of disparate hues, right and left, young and old, united as they have in the past week around Navalny and against passive acceptance of Putin. Protest has always prompted alarm behind the Kremlin’s high, red walls, which are haunted by histories of revolutions rooted in mass protest, from the Bolshevik takeover to the death throes of communism.

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Commentary for The New York Times

The editor of the Mediazona news site was jailed for 25 days in a sign of a tightening crackdown against free expression following the return to Russia of opposition leader Aleksei A. Navalny.

Tatiana Stanovaya, a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Moscow Center, described in a commentary the crackdown as the mark of a new phase in the Kremlin’s treatment of the anti-Putin opposition.

In years past, the Kremlin’s goal was to delegitimize the opposition in the eyes of the public and keep it out of official politics. Now, she said, it is being criminalized and cast as a national security threat.

At the same time, Mr. Putin’s critics are for the first time uniting around a single figure — Mr. Navalny.

“A time of great confrontation has arrived,” Ms. Stanovaya wrote.

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Commentary for Bloomberg

Russia’s Jailing of Putin Foe Navalny Draws U.S., European Ire

Updated on

Navalny raised the focus on officials’ opulent lifestyles in a video released after his arrest that’s got 108 million views and alleged that Putin owns a giant $1.3 billion Black Sea palace. Putin dismissed the claim and a billionaire ally, Arkady Rotenberg, said last week that he is the beneficial owner of the residence.

“The opposition outside the system is seen by the Kremlin as a hostile force, a threat to national security, which requires harsh, merciless, repressive tactics against Navalny” and his allies, said Tatiana Stanovaya, head of political consultancy R.Politik. “This is only the beginning.”

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2018-The-Guardian-logo-design
Commentary for The Guardian

Kremlin shrugs off Navalny backlash as protesters crowd jails

in Moscow

1,438 more reportedly arrested amid brutal police crackdown following opposition leader’s imprisonment

Tatiana Stanovaya, a political analyst and founder of R.Politik, said the harsh sentence against Navalny was part of a campaign to “demonstrate that no move aimed against the security services would remain unpunished”.

She said the government was ready to weather the backlash to Navalny’s imprisonment, whether it be international condemnation or street demonstrations in Russia. “Make no mistake, the Kremlin is not terribly afraid of protests,” she said.

The jailing of Navalny, who arrested last month on his return to Russia after surviving a suspected FSB assassination attempt with the poison novichok, has sparked international outrage. The US secretary of state, Anthony Blinken, has demanded his unconditional and immediate release and the UK prime minister, Boris Johnson, called the sentencing “pure cowardice”.

READ MORE

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Commentary for The Financial Times

‘The only verdict allowed’: Navalny’s jailing is a watershed for Russia

Opposition activist’s long sentence underscores Kremlin will not brook any dissent


“The current situation is just the beginning,” Tatiana Stanovaya, founder of R. Politik, a Russia-focused political think-tank, wrote on Telegram. “A flywheel has been set in motion, which pits the most powerful repressive inertia against any manifestation of “out-of-systemism” — this will affect activists, journalists, bloggers, media, NGOs, as well as bystanders, witnesses, students and teachers.” The clampdown shows how the stakes have risen since Mr Navalny came to prominence during protests against Mr Putin’s return to power in 2011. Then, the authorities appeared noticeably reluctant to jail him.

times
Commentary for The Times

Russia protests: Putin misjudges his greatest threat — the people

The mass demonstrations triggered by the arrest of Alexei Navalny show the president’s dark arts are failing him, writes Matthew Campbell

The Sunday Times

For Tatiana Stanovaya, a political analyst with the Carnegie Moscow Centre, this is, in a sense, the secret of his survival. “The reasons for supporting Putin have changed,” she said. “Before it was for positive reasons, people felt proud about Russia. Now they vote for him out of fear that the situation could get a lot worse under someone else. They are afraid of a return to the Yeltsin era.”

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financial-times-logo
A quote in the Financial Times

Putin denies Navalny’s Black Sea palace claims

President makes remarks in wake of protests across Russia in support of jailed opposition leader
in Moscow, 26 January
“The very fact that Putin commented on Navalny’s film is indirect acknowledgment that popular anger is justified,” Tatiana Stanovaya, founder of political consulting firm R Politik, wrote on messaging app Telegram. “But then the question arises: should the people take Putin at his word? OK, it’s not yours. But without an answer to the question about ‘who has the pleasure’ it looks ridiculous.”
financial-times-logo
Comment for The Financial Times

Alexei Navalny’s detention to test Russian activist’s support

Kremlin warns protests planned for weekend breach law as fears of opposition crackdown grow


“Navalny now is not just a physical person, Navalny is somehow a movement: with its values, regional infrastructure and activists,” said Tatiana Stanovaya, founder of Russian political consultancy R. Politik. “So if the Kremlin just puts Navalny in prison and does nothing else, it will make the work of [his team] more difficult but will not stop it.”

“The Kremlin demonstrates very hardline intentions,” said Ms Stanovaya. “So the question is whether the Kremlin will opt for steamroller tactics? It seems to me rather logical.” “[They] can really suppress regional infrastructure; hamper the work of Navalny’s team in Russia, as well as impeding the spread of the investigations in social media and on the internet in general, including YouTube,” she added. “But what they can’t do is to hamper work for those investigators who are abroad.”
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Comment for TIME

‘Putin Is a Thief.’ Thousands of Pro-Navalny Protesters Detained as U.S. Condemns Crackdown

UPDATED: JANUARY 24

The protests are a defining moment for the opposition as President Vladimir Putin, who has been in power since 2000, increasingly seeks to silence the opposition. Although Navalny remains a polarizing figure in Russia—a September survey by the Levada Center, an independent pollster in Moscow, found that 20% of Russians support Navalny’s work, while 50% disapprove—dissatisfaction against the Putin regime is growing. “[The protests] will speak more about the strength of the opposition against Putin, than Navalny’s popularity,” says Tatiana Stanovaya, founder of Moscow-based political consultancy firm, R. Politik.

A major driving force behind the protests, says Stanovaya, is Navalny’s video exposé earlier this week claiming that Putin spent $1.35 billion in illicit funds provided by members of his inner circle to build an opulent palace in a Black Sea resort town. The investigation, posted to the activist’s YouTube channel on Jan. 19, has been viewed more than 58 million times. Dmitry Peskov, Putin’s spokesperson, has called the claims “pure nonsense.” Videos on Saturday showed protestors in the far eastern city of Vladivostok shouting “Putin is a thief!”

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